2019 Ferrari 488 Pista – Factory Production

2019 Ferrari 488 Pista – Factory Production

2019 Ferrari 488 Pista – Factory Production https://goo.gl/od4XYP

With the last diesel-belching Iveco truck out of the way, my mind goes from thinking of new email passwords—I’m way past my dogs and onto my friend’s pets—and focuses on the power of the Pista’s engine. A dry-sump twin-turbocharged 3.9-liter V-8 bolts deep in the middle of the car. Compared with the heart of the 488GTB upon which the Pista is based, 50 percent of the Pista engine’s parts are new. A lighter crankshaft and flywheel fling lighter titanium connecting rods with a claimed 17 percent reduction of inertia. The compression ratio rises from 9.4:1 to 9.6:1, and more aggressive cams work with shorter intake runners and a new Inconel exhaust manifold that reduces backpressure and weighs 21 pounds less than the GTB’s cast unit. Ferrari found an additional 49 horsepower and dropped nearly 40 pounds from the V-8. In total, Ferrari claims a 176-pound weight reduction versus the GTB. Opt for the carbon-fiber wheels, a Ferrari first, and the weight drops by another 22 pounds.

The engine’s 710 horsepower doesn’t just arrive, it barges in and puts its hooves on the coffee table. Power doesn’t peak, it plateaus. From 6750 rpm to the 8000-rpm redline, the V-8 continues to make all of its 710 horsepower. Redline shifts from first to second to third never drop below 6750 rpm, so even after a shift you’re still in the land of 710 horsepower. Launch control is actuated by a Launch button on the LaFerrari-like carbon-fiber outcropping that sprouts from the center console. Push the button, then hold one foot on the brake and the other on the accelerator, and the Pista will rev the engine to 3000 rpm before takeoff. If you’re not ready for it, your head won’t stand a chance. Even though the Pista sends torque only to the rear wheels, the careful tuning of the torque curve, power delivery, and available traction are an eye-opening match that even Tinder couldn’t make.

First gear doesn’t last long, but what’s odd is that second gear is gone in a flash as well. Second passes so fast that we had to study some video to see what happened. It’s tough to evaluate a car when an acute case of the giggles accompanies every hit of the pedal to the metal. It’s actually metal, too, as the Pista can be spec’d with a bare aluminum floor that’ll tink tink with every pebble tossed up by the Michelin Pilot Sport Cup 2 rubber. (The Scuderia did that, too.) Although it pegs our own giggle meter, Ferrari’s acceleration claims might be of more interest. How about a believable zero-to-124-mph time of 7.6 seconds? We’d expect a sub-3.0-second run to 60. Another advantage of going solo: With no passenger along, there’s no one to roll their eyes when you do seven consecutive launch-control starts. It may have been 10.